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On Revenge As Motivation and How Grand Slams Kill Rallies

September 15, 2018

Tags: Brigham Young - Tanner Mangum, Wisconsin - Rafael Gaglianone, Alex Hornibrook, Jonathan Taylor, LA Dodgers, Yasiel Puig, St. Louis Cardinals, Patrick Wisdom, Miguel Andujar

This is an amazing time of year for the sports nut and couch potatoes. Baseball pennant and wild card races are heading towards climaxes and college football has begun with a fury.

I was worried that my graduate alma mater Wisconsin was overrated as a possible college playoff team and Brigham Young proved my fears warranted Saturday afternoon in Madison. On the second hottest day in Camp Randall Stadium history - field temperatures rose to 120 at one point - the Utah eleven avenged last year's rout by the Badgers in Provo with a hard-fought 24-21 victory.

The Badgers had a chance to force overtime but after two timeouts to ice him, the usually reliable kicker Rafael Gaglianone missed a 42-yard field goal. Wisconsin never got into a rhythm all day. Star running back Jonathan Taylor did not fumble but didn't break any big runs.

Badgers southpaw quarterback Alex Hornibrook threw a key interception early in the second half that set up a Cougar TD and gave them control of the game even though Wisconsin did briefly tie. Brigham Young's 25-year-old senior quarterback Reese Mangum played virtually flawlessly.

It was sweet revenge for a team that was embarrassed 40-6 last year. There is nothing like getting even in sports - and maybe in life too - as a motivation.

The LA Dodgers are proving that in St Louis, battering the Cardinals' young pitching staff in the first three games of their pivotal series for wild card position. Just a few weeks ago, the Cardinals roared into LA and swept four from the defending NL champions.

Though by inclination I root against the rich goliath Dodgers and Yankees, I knew that the Dodgers were not to be counted out. They are an explosive team and no one can be more explosive than Cuban defector right fielder Yasiel Puig who had four homers in the Fri and Sat games in St. Louis, with 3 HRs and 7 RBI in Sat's 17-4 romp.

The only runs for St Louis in this game was a grand slam HR by rookie Patrick Wisdom. It would be their only runs this day. Of course, no one can turn down a grand slammer but I think Patrick would agree that baseball wisdom decrees that a grand slam home run often kills a rally.

Same thing happened to the Yankees on Saturday. Miguel Andujar's grand slammer brought the Yankees to 8-7 in chase of Toronto. But they never really threatened again. The grand slammer killed the rally.

Why? Because the bases are then empty so the pitcher no longer worries about base runners and can use his normal full pitching motion. Just another of baseball's wonderful anomalies and contradictions.

That's all for now but there will be more highlights ahead to discuss as wild card positioning in both leagues is still wide open. Stay tune.

And always remember: Take it easy but take it!

Comments

  1. September 18, 2018 9:19 AM EDT
    Nothing about the Orioles being the first team to put players' names on uniforms in Braille, a reading system consisting of raised dots. Who, exactly, is supposed to be able to read the names? I realize that they sold them and the proceeds went to an organization that benefits the blind, but what a concept.
    - Benita Black
  2. September 18, 2018 9:36 AM EDT
    It seems so fitting that this well-meaning gesture is a product of a historically horrible team. It remains my team for the foreseeable future but would welcome a "Under New Management and Ownership" sign asap.
    - Lee Lowenfish
  3. September 19, 2018 10:27 PM EDT
    Thanks! I'll keeping reading!
    - Becca Pulliam

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